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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
by the audience, of faculty members, and political science department, as well as the byu law school. some questions were edited for clarity. mr. hall will have the first question of the debate. for subsequent questions, we will alternates. each candidate will have a minute to as a question and both will have an additional 30 seconds for a bottle. if i determine that a follow-up question is aboard -- is appropriate, each will have a follow-up question. the first is from joseph, a student at purdum non-. -- at byu. >> what responsibilities are the state and local government and what responsibilities, if any, are the federal government? >> i served on the board of directors for sutter health care, so the largest not-for- profit health-careization in california we have known for a long time that we've had to have affordable quality health care. it is all our responsibility. under the affordable care act, we are first beginning to do what we need to do to reform health care system to make it affordable for all of us. i would like to put my children back on to health care until they're 26. i al
financial crisis. he has worked to develop new systems and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his writing has appeared in "the wall street journal." it is my pleasure to welcome to the state chair dr. kim. [applause] >> take you for your kind introduction. but the korean economic institute is honored to be a co- sponsor of this panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian affairs. i can think of no better partners than the amend school of foreign services and the president and georgetown university to share this platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i think that that 21st century will be seen as the asia-pacific century. much of the economic dynamism and grit will emerge from this region. many of the toughest gruel challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and the scurvy problems on the korean peninsula. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in this region will be critical in these and many more issues ahead. as the president of the e
science guy. i have to tell you, michael bloomberg is an opportunist. you violated the new york city charter by running for a third term as mayor. we are in a very dire state here and i wish republicans run the country would offer us new york republicans help and an opportunity to really balance out the political system here. host: thank you for the call this morning. if a time for a few more calls. all weekend long we will be featuring the history and literary life of vermont capital city with a population of just about 8000 people. the smallest united states state capitol. here is the mayor talking about the city. [video clip] >> it is the smallest state capital and america. in terms of vermont, we have the largest historic district in the state. it is a very historic community, founded in 1791. it is run to about 20,000 during the day. largely because of the jobs that are here, the center of commerce and the area. we are fortunate here that we are somewhat insulated from a lot of the trends that occurred nationally. our economy is pretty stable because we rely on the state as a pr
what the record and science say about the but secular course this storm is taking. -- of the particular course the storm is taking. >> what makes every storm unique is a combination of things, the time of year, strength of the structure in magnitude and size. sandy is unique in a number of ways. it is certainly not common for a system to come in at this strength. but if you look back in history, tropical cyclones have come up the east coast many times in the past. the whole east coast is vulnerable to storm surges and hurricanes. look at isabel in 2003 that came in a little bit further south and had all the storm surge. it has taken a different path, going it in a different direction than this one is. every storm is unique. this is not 100 percent unprecedented, but certainly not common to have a system of this magnitude coming from this direction at this time of year, and what makes this nearly unprecedented and very unusual is the transition to oppose best tropical cyclone and all the different hazards you have in one time. >> i think this is the only time i know of with the hurricane
and i built a solar car that we raced across the united states. this is not rocket science, folks. this industry has been around a long time. it just requires political leadership. political leadership that my opponent is not willing to exercise. >> the political leadership came from the president of the united states. we both agree coal must be part of america's energy future. it is low cost, it is much cleaner than it was 30 years ago, and i am and all the above energy kind of gal. the energy costs about 5 cents a kilowatt hour. currently, solar energy is four or five times that much. if coal is the fuel of the past, reasonably priced electric bills are a thing of the past. i'm going to fight for those jobs and i will fight for low- cost energy. >> ok. that concludes the first half of our debate. we will take a 60-90 second non- commercial break and we'll be right back with you. thank you. [applause] >> we will go ahead and get the second part of the debate started. as i mentioned, the situation will be reversed in terms of the questioning. the first part of the second half of t
. there was a very controversial position i took at the time. i am going to be driven by the science. i agree with what mr. gregg said. the natural resources defense council ranked two of the beaches among best in the country for two years in a row. >> do have any advice on how to deal with these issues in the state? >> one of the students is my daughter. she is interested in these issues. i think delaware is a tremendous place. we have beautiful places, a beautiful environment and we have to work hard to make sure we're protecting that. i think a great environment is a bonus in terms of economic development. gov. peterson past the coastal zone act. people thought that was an economic -- it was an anti-jobs. it turned out to be the opposite. because we have such a beautiful delaware bay, businesses want to be here. that is why we're fake -- focused on the bayshore initiative. one of the objections i have is the thing of the power plant in the coastal zone. the pollutants are sulfur trade we have done is we have waived the requirement to put that manufacturing facility in the coastal zone. we
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)